Mothering In The Middle

After extensive research into comments sections and Facebook statuses, I have concluded there are only two groups of mothers. You must select one cult in its ENTIRETY. No picksy choosies. Group 1:  Dirty hippies. They love ebf, bwing, blwing, ap, … Continue reading

Nursing a Baby With a Little Something Extra

  Our journey started October 9, 2014. I gave birth by C-section to a little boy named Anthony Joseph (AJ). AJ was born with a little something extra- he was born with Down Syndrome. AJ has a big sister, Bella (with no … Continue reading

WMC Doula Collective

Whole Mothering Center is pleased to launch the first cooperative doula practice in Southeast Texas! We’ve had this in the works for a while now, and are so happy to be able to share the news with you! WMC is … Continue reading

At the Expo: a FREEBIE, a Seminar and other fun!

WMC

Whole Mothering Center made an appearance at The Cumulus Baby and Family Expo this past Saturday. WMC doulas, Amy Jones and Emily Ochoa, were there to meet and talk with new and expectant parents along with WMC founding mother, Heather Thomas and our featured blogger, Anna Sites. This was Whole Mothering Center’s first year participating in the event and we were so honored to have been asked to present a seminar on “Preparing for Birth and Beyond”.

We drew for and gave away a $575.00 value doula package during the expo. Lots of hopeful familes entered to win and a very sweet first time expectant mom, Dorian Chapman, won the package. Emily and Amy are looking forward to working with her as she prepares to meet her new baby girl in a couple of months. We will be following Dorian in our blog as she gets closer to her due date and updating you all with frequent blog posts after our meetings with her and her husband. Dorian is planning a natural, intervention-free birth in a Beaumont area hospital with Dr. Kevin Waddell, who just happens to be one of our favorite local OBs. Dr. Waddell stopped by our booth at the expo and spent a bit chatting with us and we were all so pleased to see him. Dorian’s going to have a great birth with him and we’re excited to have the opportunity to work with her and offer her support in achieving her goal of a natural birth! As a bonus, we’ll be photographing her birth and we’ll share those photos in our blog as soon as we can get them uploaded once her baby arrives earthside…all of us at WMC are eager to meet Miss Avery Ryan sometime in October!

During our seminar, we began with talking about Whole Mothering Center’s history and services that we offer to the local community. We moved on to speaking about birth plans, including how to write one, why they’re important and how Whole Mothering Center helps our clients work through writing a birth plan. We discussed different pregnancy and labor providers like doulas, midwives and obstetricians, how each of those providers serves pregnant and birthing women, how their roles overlap and how to integrate each into pregnancy and birthing experiences. Informed consent was a primary focus of our seminar and we defined it, talked about how it is obtained, how to revoke consent, what the responsibilities are of the provider who obtains informed consent from a patient as well as what the responsibilities are of a patient granting it, and how doulas can help their clients as they grant their medical providers their informed consent. We also presented birthing location options available to local women. For Southeast Texas, these include birthing at home, at a birth center and at area hospitals which have labor and delivery units. We talked about the pros and cons of each location and what services providers who work in those locations can provide to birthing women. Finally, we stressed the importance of women surrounding themselves with a supportive community as they move through pregnancy and into new mommy-hood. Finding a tribe is such an important part of becoming a mother and Whole Mothering Center offers several free opportunities for local women to find like-minded mama friends who can mentor them and offer advice as they navigate all the scary “firsts” that come along with becoming a new parent! For more information, visit our services page!

ACOG at odds with other OB governing organizations in the world?

Interesting stuff…

This was taken from the CIMS newsletter, here.

“The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently revised its 2003 guidelines for induction of labor.  The ACOG Practice Bulletin, Number 107, published in the August 2009 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology serves as a resource to help medical practitioners make decisions about appropriate methods of cervical ripening and induction of labor and their effectiveness.  At least two of the ACOG recommendations, inducing labor for “psychosocial” (non-medical) reasons and cervical ripening with the synthetic prostaglandin misoprostol (trade name Cytotec), differ from labor induction practice guidelines issued by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), which drafts clinical guidelines in the U.K.
Induced labor puts women and babies at risk.  Compared to women who go into labor on their own, women who have an elective induction are at increased risk for intrapartum fever, instrumental birth, cesarean section, and are more likely to use analgesia including epidurals. Babies are at risk for irregular heart rate patterns, shoulder dystocia, neonatal phototherapy to treat jaundice, neonatal resuscitation and admission to a neonatal intensive care unit.  These risks are documented in CIMS’ “Evidence Basis for the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care” (see Step 6, pages 42-43).  According to the white paper “Idealized Design of Perinatal Care” published by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, “Based on a review of U.S. medical malpractice claims, [the labor-inducing drug] oxytocin is involved in more than 50 percent of the situations leading to birth trauma.”

These complications of labor also impact mother-infant attachment and the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding.  See “Breastfeeding is Priceless” (PDF).

Although ACOG approves of “psychosocial” induction, NICE clinical guidance (PDF) warns that induction of labor has a significant impact on the health of women and their babies; it should be clinically justified and should not routinely be offered on maternal request except under extraordinary circumstances.  SOGC advises that there is no benefit to elective induction (PDF).  Because it is associated with potential complications, elective induction should be discouraged and only provided after women have been fully informed of the risks and of the inaccuracy of establishing gestational age.  ACOG approves of inducing labor at 39 weeks while SOGC states gestational age should be at least 41 completed weeks, and NICE guidelines state induction for non-medical reason can be considered at or after 40 weeks.

Misoprostol, an inexpensive synthetic prostaglandin, was developed and is marketed to prevent and treat gastric and duodenal ulcers.  The use of misoprostol for cervical ripening and induction of labor (off-label use) is approved by ACOG, but not recommended by either SOGC or NICE.  Misoprostol, also known as PG1, is not approved by the manufacturer for use in pregnancy (PDF).  Misoprostol is associated with excessive uterine contractions, fetal heart abnormality, hemorrhage, hysterectomy, and sometimes fetal death.  Both SOGC and NICE recommend its use be restricted to clinical trials.  For a more detailed discussion of the use of misoprostol for induction of labor, see Science & Sensibility.com.

Nearly one in four births in the U.S. is induced (PDF) and according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), although it is not entirely clear what proportion of these inductions are elective (i.e. without a medical indication), the overall rate of induction of labor is rising faster than the rate of pregnancy complications that would lead to a medically-indicated induction.  According to Childbirth Connection’s report, “Evidence-Based Care: What it Is and What It Can Achieve,” the most common gestational age at birth among single babies in the U.S. is now 39 weeks rather than 40 weeks.”

Consumer information on induction of labor is available from:

I find it interesting that the guidelines that our country uses are at odds with those used by Canada and the UK, and yet those countries have better maternal and infant mortality rates than we do. Am I the only one that sees a connection there?

If they say social pressure is not a good reason for induction, and they say that babies fare better when mother goes into labor on her own, and they say that mother fares better when allowed to go into labor on her own, and they remind us that the drug commonly used in US inductions is not approved for use in pregnancy… yet ACOG allows (if not encourages) all of those things… and THEY have better outcomes, it would seem to me that ACOG would be adopting some of those same policies when they update, rather than continuing to go in the opposite direction.

~h